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Matt Mendenhall

I doubt it could be cloned, but I know that scientists are studying its DNA.

Go GIANTS!

do they really think that they can clone a bird from the past

Matt Mendenhall

Hi Doug, Thanks for your kind note. I found the illustration on Wikimedia Commons: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Chendytes_lawi.jpg

The artist, Stanton F. Fink, has illustrated lots of extinct animals:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Apokryltaros

You'd have to ask him if it's available as a print. This page appears to be how to contact him:
http://apokryltaros.50megs.com/contact.html

Good luck.

doug l

Wonderful article. I love the illustration. Is it available as a print? It should be....

ed

I don't advocate cloning every animal which has gone extinct. But if humans hunted it to extinction and habitat still exists to support it, I think we should try to bring it back. Such is the case with this bird. Can they extract enough DNA from those bones? With so many bones around I'm sure they could. Why not try it?

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