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vacations in USA

If you ask me they are looking in the wrong direction! Vacations and recreation time are great and can be educational and all, but people will care for nature when they live in it, I am not saying let us all move in to the wild- but sometimes it is hard to find one park in a neighborhood - not to talk about a piece of lovely pure wild nature! I don't think that a few vacations can change this situation - we need to change the way we live :)

Alan

This is interesting.I'm in the UK, my view is we need to bring about a sea change in education. Every school should have a mentor, every child should have at least one outdoor lesson in 'The Environment' at least once a week. Every child should be offered a free membership of the RSPB (or each countries equivalent organisation.

Bill Witt

I often work with young adults in the university setting where I'm employed, as well as in several voluntary community, environmental, and human services organizations. The group now in their early to mid-20s is giving me more optimism about our future than I've felt in the past 15 to 20 years. These young men and women are idealistic, altruistic, bright and willing to work for things they believe in. Protecting the environment is high on just about all their lists. They are the cohort we began teaching about environmental values and ethics in the late 1980s. They're now completing their undergraduate and/or graduate educations, and they are entering the workforce. Over the next few years, they will begin raising their children. Before we begin give in to gloom, let's see what these wonderful young adults will be doing in the way of outdoor mentoring and recreation. Let's also keep in mind that, given our demographics, they will at the projected peak of their earning power have more potential for relative affluence than we have enjoyed. Let's keep in touch with them, let's keep reinforcing their environmental values, and then let's see how the trend lines are running a decade from now.

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  • What the editors of Birder's World (and a few of the editors' good friends) find in their field of view when they work on the magazine, look through their binoculars, and consider the world of birds and birdwatching.

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